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Editorial

The Limitless Horizon for Touch
By Stephen P. Atwood

Industry News

By Jenny Donelan

Guest Editorial

The Best of Times
By Geoff Walker

President's Corner

Anniversary of a Prediction
By Paul Drzaic

Frontline Technology: LCD In-Cell Touch

Imagine being able to touch the surface of any display with your finger or a stylus and have the location of your touch instantly identified down to the exact pixels. Imagine this happening with no cover glass or special coatings or any other obstruction in front of the display, and with minimal change inside the display. That's the promise of in-cell touch. The problem is that the promise remains mostly out of reach. This article explores that promise and its current status in detail.
By Geoff Walker and Mark Fihn

Frontline Technology: Projected-Capacitive Touch Technology

Projected-capacitive touch has grown extremely rapidly from obscurity in 2006 to the number-two touch technology in 2009. This article examines all aspects of projected-capacitive touch technology, delving into sensor, controller, and module details. art6 By Gary Barrett and Ryomei OmoteTouch screens are in widespread use, due to the intuitive interfaces they enable, which can save time and increase productivity. Falling component prices have also spurred adoption, with consumer products increasingly being designed around touch screens. Touch-screen devices are also widely perceived as cool and fun.
By Gary Barrett and Ryomei Omote

Display Marketplace: The State of the Touch-Screen Market in 2010

Touch screens are in widespread use, due to the intuitive interfaces they enable, which can save time and increase productivity. Falling component prices have also spurred adoption, with consumer products increasingly being designed around touch screens. Touch-screen devices are also widely perceived as cool and fun.
By Jennifer Colegrove

Enabling Technology: Touch Screens and Touch Surfaces are Enriched by Haptic Force-Feedback

Tactile feedback can enable more effective use of touch screens, particularly in automotive applications where driver distraction is a problem. The number of technologies used to produce haptic effects continues to increase, providing many options and opportunities for system designers.
By Bruce Banter

Journal of the SID April Contents

Enabling Technology: Beneath the Surface

Surface computing is about integrating the physical world and the virtual world through the use of vision-based touch. While Microsoft's Surface product is the best-known implementation of surface computing, it is far from the only one. Expanding university research on touch continues to make use of vision-based touch as a foundation, which in turn will help move surface computing toward full commercialization.
By Geoff Walker and Mark Fihn

Making Displays Work for You: Taking Touch to New Frontiers: Why It Makes Sense and How to Make It Happen

Touch interfaces are appearing in everything from consumer devices to industrial equipment, not because touch is "in fashion," but because it provides a truly better form of human-device interaction. This article examines the advantages of gesture-based touch interfaces and the key steps to building a device with a great touch experience.
By Mark Hamblin

Display Week 2010 First Looks: Green Technology

By Don Carkner

Display Week 2010 First Looks: Touch Technology

By Jenny Donelan

SID News: Latin Display 2009